African Penguin

African Penguin, 5 x 7 ink (O, P)

African Penguin, 5 x 7 ink (O, P); original photo credit A. Phillips

Otherwise known as Jackass Penguins.  This ink is from a photo my relative took of a wild penguin in Africa.  He had this to say:

When I went to South Africa I did not know about the penguins. I took a tour to the Cape of Good Hope and the Boulders Beach Park was part of the tour. There were park rangers there to keep the tourists from getting too close. Penguins will bite. There are only 2 or 3 kinds of penguins that like ice and snow. There are maybe 17 kinds that do not. At least one of my pictures shows a girl in a bikini sunbathing on the sand with penguins walking around her. The penguin in your picture is not trying to keep the egg warm. It is shading the egg from the sun to prevent overheating.

Nellie

2014-12-02 Nellie

Nellie, 8 x 10 Pastel (O, P)

As soon as I saw my relative’s dog, I wanted to paint her.  And when I saw her jump up on the colorful sofa for a break from the guests, I knew I had my composition.

Max

Max (8x10 Pastel) O, P

Max (8×10 Pastel) O, P

This is a beloved dopey dog Max.

I never realized he had so many colors in his grey fur until I saw the source photo this is based on, him in front of the terra-cotta tile.

Girly

Girly, 8 x 10 Watercolor (O, P)

Girly, 8 x 10 Watercolor (O, P)

This is an experiment: a new technique and a slightly new style I’m trying.  Same old subject matter.

The September meeting of the Pittsford Art Group included a demo by Stu Chait, abstract watercolorist.  He drops paint onto a flat surface by either squeezing the paint out of a big brush, or pouring it from a cup.

portrait by Leanne Sarubbi

portrait by Leanne Sarubbi

I thought this might work well for an idea I got at the Roco 6×6 show.  I was inspired by this portrait at the left, and so I thought maybe one could combine Chait’s abstract big drop idea and Sarubbi’s high-contrast simplification.  I ended up modifying it significantly as you see, by putting in eye and ear color, and I chickened out on leaving the chest all white, instead putting in a light drop-in of the same colors to set the chest back from the face.  I loved how the “black” came out, and that has no subtle shading on it on purpose, requiring the shape to tell your eye what the form is.  I feel I made the background too bold, but other than that I like it.  I did the whiskers with white gouache again.

This work is painted with 4 colors: Intense Blue, Yellow Ochre, Cadmium Red Deep, and Burnt Umber, the “black” being all but Yellow Ochre.  I almost never use more than 5 colors in a painting.

 

Noelle

2014-07 Noelle

Noelle, 8 x 10 Watercolor (O)

This is a commission piece.  Noelle looks like a very sweet dog.

I used gouache in a painting for the first time, to do the white whiskers.  Usually I use a razor blade (scratches away the paint revealing the white paper) but it wasn’t doing what I wanted.  Masking fluid never does what I want.  Gouache is an opaque watercolor, so it can be used on top of any color.